Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten.

The “limited” strike might cost the country billions, the burden of which will be shared by American taxpayers. Therefore, the country’s taxpayers must be considered.

If Congress supports Obama, it gives him the authority to order limited strikes against the Syrian military for 60 days without the use of ground troops. It can be extended by 30 days on certain conditions. Yet the cost of these limited strikes can grow to billions as each missile costs more than $1 million. Ultimately, the costs will be borne by the American taxpayers.

The big question raised by the American media is whether American taxpayers are financially responsible for defending Syrians. There is no direct answer to this question, as the facts about the planned strikes are still not final.

Defense experts have warned that the cost of operating ships outside their routine operating schedule can add tens of millions in incremental costs. After weighing the effects of striking, Congress must decide whether to intervene in Syria or not.

Obama Gains Support on Syria: What about the Taxpayers?

President Obama is slowly gaining more support for strikes in Syria, but it will only be after the support of Congress that he will be able to lead the U.S. in an intervention in Syria. Amidst the talk of saving Syria on humanitarian grounds, American taxpayers have been forgotten. The “limited” strike might cost the...